2019-2020 Courses - Fall

Undergraduate

6A   Art Survey I: Ancient-Medieval - Moser
6DW   Survey: Arts of Japan and Korea - Wattles
6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning - Wittman
6K   Survey: Islamic Art & Architecture - Khoury

105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture - Badamo
111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579-1648 - Adams
113F   Bernini and the Age of the Baroque - Paul
121B   Reconstruction, Renaissance, and Realism in American Art: 1860 - 1900 - Garfinkle
121E   Three-Dimensional Arts of the United States: Meaning, Context, Reception - Garfinkle
127A   African Art I - Ogbechie
130D   Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Andes - Boswell
134H   Ukiyo-e: Pictures of the the Floating World - Wattles   [cross-listed with JAPAN 134H]
136K   Modern Architecture in Early Twentieth-Century Europe - Welter
141MH   Museums and History - McLemore
143F   Architectural Criticism and Exhibitions: Exploring the Holdings of the ADC - Baciu
186SV   Seminar in Modern Architecture: Bauhaus in California - Welter
187H   Museums in Transition: From the Early Modern to the Modern Period - Paul

Graduate

253D   Topics in Medieval Architecture and Sculpture: The Global Turn in Premodern Art History - Badamo
254   Topics in Pre-Columbian/Colonial Latin American Art - Boswell
257A   Topics in Seventeenth-Century European Art: Visual Culture and the Early Modern Global World - Adams


6A   Art Survey I: Ancient - Medieval     TR   930-1045   CAMPBELL HALL     Moser

History of Western art from its origins to the beginnings of the Renaissance.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   T   1100-1150   ARTS 1332

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6DW   Survey: Arts of Japan and Korea     TR   930-1045  HSSB 1174    Wattles

Surveys the arts of Japan and the Korean peninsula from pre-historic to contemporary times. The focus is on the evolving role of the artist within society.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning     MW   1230-145   BIOEN 1001     Wittman

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the middle of the 20th century. The focus is decidedly global in the first half of the course, and more European in the second half. Students will encounter a variety of buildings and cities, but also different ways of understanding and studying them. Student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local architecture and town planning.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6K   Survey: Islamic Art & Architecture     MW   1100-1215   BIOEN 1001     Khoury

A survey of Islamic art and architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture     MW   500-615   ARTS 1341     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

This course explores the soaring cathedrals, monstrous sculptures, and marvelous images that inspired The Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones. Beginning with the fourth-century rise of Christian images and ending with the advent of print, it traces how images developed new roles — and reinvented old ones — over the course of the Middle Ages. Investigating architecture, sculpture, and manuscripts in their historical contexts, it asks why medieval objects look the way they do and how viewers saw them.

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111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579-1648     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Adams

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

The first half of the seventeenth century in Holland, the period from the Union of Utrecht of 1579 and its declaration of independence from Spain, to the recognition of the Northern Netherlands as an independent nation in 1648, was the first part of a century that has come to be known as the Dutch "Golden Age" of Dutch art. This era witnessed the emergence of a Protestant mercantile culture in which the Catholic Church and the hereditary nobility were supplanted by democratic institutions and middle-class merchants as major patrons of the arts. These men and women supported such artists as Rembrandt van Rijn and Frans Hals as well as a host of lesser known masters who created images rooted in everyday life rather than the imaginary religious, historical, and mythological imagery of previous centuries. This course examines the cultural functions of this rich, apparently descriptive imagery as it helped to form the private identities and public ambitions of Europe's first middle-class capitalist society. We examine the aesthetics and content of this imagery through contemporary economic, historic, religious, and literary developments, and the emerging scientific revolution.

The emphasis in this class is upon the social and intellectual issues engaged by Dutch painting: how they participated in the struggle between the values of a new middle-class and capitalist culture in conflict with an older way of life. At the same time, it examines the varieties of art historical methods employed by contemporary scholars, as well as those of the past, to understand these images. The goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in knowledge about seventeenth century Dutch art and culture, with a focus upon critical analysis of images as well as the structure of arguments that have been made about them. These skills are intended to be ones that you may be able to apply both in other courses, as well as information you encounter and arguments you construct in your daily life.

GE: AREA F

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113F   Bernini and the Age of the Baroque     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Examines the life and work of Gianlorenzo Bernini, best known as a brilliant and innovative sculptor, in their historical context. Also considered is the international influence that Bernini exerted on seventeenth- and eighteeth-century art.

GE: AREA F

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121B   Reconstruction, Renaissance, and Realism in American Art: 1860 - 1900     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Painting within the context of the human-made environment, from the onset of the Civil War to just before World War I, tracing the role of art in the rise of modern, corporate and industrial America.

GE: AREA F, AMERICAN HISTORY AND INSTITUTIONS

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121E   Three-Dimensional Arts of the United States: Meaning, Context, Reception     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

From Puritan gravestones to park fountains to war memorials, American sculpture has been a barometer of the political, cultural, religious and artistic trends of our society. This course covers the carvings of the first settlements, figural sculpture of colonial America, various art movements and sculptural forms from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries as well as the current controversies surrounding public art.

GE: AREA F

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127A   African Art I     TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course provides an introduction to African art through analysis of African cultures and symbol systems. It evaluates African art in relation to the history and diversity of the continent and also in relation to perceptions and representations of Africa from antiquity to the contemporary era. Types of arts discussed include painting, sculpture, textiles and body adornment, ceramics, performance, and contemporary African art.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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130D   Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Andes     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Boswell

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The architecture, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, and metalwork of the Andean civilizations from 3000 BCE to 1532 CE are examined within their archaeological and cultural contexts.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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134H   Ukiyo-e: Pictures of the Floating World     TR   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Wattles
   [cross-listed with JAPAN 134H]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Japanese paintings and woodblock prints of the sixteenth through twentieth centuries, with emphasis on issues of genre and format.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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136K   Modern Architecture in Early Twentieth‐Century Europe     MW   200-315   ARTS 1341     Welter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This class will study various modern movements in architecture that emerged in Europe from the late nineteenth century onward. Art Nouveau, Vienna Moderne, Deutsche Werkbund, Futurism, Expressionism, Constructivism, De Stijl, and Bauhaus, for example, all put forward alternative, at times conflicting visions of modern architecture and the modern societies it would help bringing about.

Open to all, though ARTHI 5A, ARTHI 6F, and upper division art history courses in modern architecture are recommended as preparation. Among the requirements are weekly think pieces and a small group research project including class‐based presentation.

GE: AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS

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141MH    Museums and History     MW    330-445   ARTS 1341     McLemore

Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors.
Prerequisite: not open to freshman.
Not open to students who completed ARTHI 120CC in Spring 2017.

This course will examine the 20th century museum’s engagement with history. We will explore curatorial strategies for telling stories about the past through historical objects, written narratives, photography, performance, architecture, and art. The course will be organized around a series of case studies including the newly-opened African American History Museum in Washington DC; the Holocaust museums in Washington DC and Berlin, Germany; the Military History Museum in Dresden, Germany; the War Remnants Museum (previously the Exhibition House for Crimes of War and Aggression) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; and the Manzanar National Historical Site in Manzanar, California. Throughout the course, we will consider how political and national climates, and curatorial and community agendas, shape how history is told within the context of the museum.

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143F     Architectural Criticism and Exhibitions: Exploring the Holdings of the ADC     TR   200-315   ARTS 1245     Baciu

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The course is developed in co-operation with the Architecture & Design Collection (ADC) and marks the inauguration of HAA’s new vault for archival studies. As such, it is not only designed to give an introduction to archival research, but also highlight the differences between the physical and the virtual. The UCSB museum exhibition opening September 27 and the holdings dedicated to the work of the architect JR Davidson will accompany us on the quest of understanding the difference between the material qualities of the architect’s work and their impact on culture at large.

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186SV   Seminar in Modern Architecture     M   1000-1250   ARTS 1245     Welter
     Topic: Bauhaus in California

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

2019 is the centenary of the Bauhaus, the revolutionary art school the architect Walter Gropius (1883-1969) founded in Germany in 1919.

This seminar researches traces and legacies of the Bauhaus in Southern California architecture and design.  Participants will study key documents and moments in the history of the Bauhaus in Weimar Germany, its flight from National Socialism to the United States (and other countries), and its influences in Californian architecture and design.

Participants commit to researching and writing a paper on an aspect of the Bauhaus legacy in California using the archival collections of the Architecture & Design Collection (ADC), Art, Design & Architecture Museum, UCSB.

Open to all, but enrollment in ARTHI 136K "Modern Architecture in early Twentieth-Century Europe” Fall 2019, is highly recommended.

GE: WRITING

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187H   Museums in Transition: From the Early Modern to the Modern Period     R   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
No restrictions to Pass 1.

Examines a range of issues — art historical, cultural, political, practical, and theoretical — that conditioned the development of museums and collections, primarily in Europe, from the Renaissance to the present day. Topics and format will vary.

GE: WRITING

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253D   Topics in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture     M   800-1050   ARTS 2622     Badamo
     Topic: The Global Turn in Premodern Art History

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Over the past few decades, global exchange has emerged as a major field of inquiry in the study of premodern visual cultures. This upsurge of interest comes at a time when traditional categories of art historical analysis have been interrogated and found wanting—especially those that separate the east and west, Christianity and Islam, and the medieval and early modern periods. In an effort to expose the artificiality of these binaries, scholars have increasingly turned to the investigation of pre-global networks, catalyzing a wave of scholarship that focuses on the nature and politics of interconnection on a global landscape. Focusing on the interface of Christian and Islamicate cultures, this course surveys new approaches to artistic exchange in the premodern era. Weekly sessions include readings on spatial formations (territories, border zones), sites of multiplicities (palaces, shrines), and mobilities (gifts, object of re-use, science/magic/technology, and cross-cultural dressing). Readings are drawn from art history, literary studies, anthropology, and post-colonial and globalization theory. Students from all disciplines and fields are welcome.

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254   Topics in Pre-Columbian/Colonial Latin American Art      M   200-450   ARTS 1245     Boswell

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in pre-Columbian and colonial Latin American art topics.

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257A   Topics in Seventeenth-Century European Art     R   1100-150   ARTS 1332     Adams
     Topic: Visual Culture and the Early Modern Global World

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

The late sixteenth- through the early eighteenth-centuries witnessed the rise of European enterprises with global ambitions from missionary attempts at conversion to Christianity, capitalist trade and colonial establishments, and the impact upon knowledge of the discoveries of new continents, peoples and cultures, and natural resources. Students with interests in all areas are welcome. The first half of the course will examine the impact on art and knowledge of the global reach of 17th-century Holland, this course takes up a series of case studies concerning race, religion, natural science, and emerging capitalism in all media including painting, prints and porcelain. The second half of the course, readings and final paper or project, will be designed around participants’ areas of interest.

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