2020-2021 Courses - Fall

(updated 10/5/2020)

Undergraduate

6A   Art Survey I: Ancient-Medieval - Moser/Thomas
6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America - Salami
6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning - Wittman
6G   Survey: History of Photography - McLemore

111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579-1648 - Adams
113B   Seventeenth Century Art in Italy I - Paul
117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism - Garfinkle
119B   Contemporary Art ‐ Sorkin
121A   American Art From Revolution to Civil War: 1700-1860 - Garfinkle
131CM   Art of Colonial Mexico - Caplan
136O   Sustainable Architecture: History and Aesthetics - Welter   [cross-listed with ENV S 136O]
186SV   Seminar in Modern Architecture: Domestic Architecture in California - Welter
187H   Museums in Transition: From the Early Modern to the Modern Period - Paul

Graduate

257A   Topics in Seventeenth-Century European Art: Representation and Protest in the Early Modern Period: The politics of belonging - Adams
263   Topics in Contemporary Art: Alchemy, Magic, and Spirituality - Sorkin
265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism: Romanticism, historicism, and architecture in Europe (c.1800 - c. 1850) - Wittman


6A   Art Survey I: Ancient - Medieval     TR   930-1045   ONLINE     Moser/Thomas

This online course—presented as a narrative-driven adventure game—will introduce students to the art and archaeology of Rome, with assignments that focus on writing and the research process. Students (players) will be asked to determine whether or not an ancient statue from a prestigious American museum should remain in the US or be sent back to Italy.

Throughout the course, students (players) will excavate artifacts at a digital dig site, visit museums, explore Roman monuments, and navigate the shadowy world of the tombaroli (tomb robbers) and mafia-run black market for antiquities. Shorter, weekly writing assignments in different genres will build up to a final research paper with accompanying video presentation.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   T   100-150   ONLINE

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6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America     MW   930-1045   ONLINE     Salami

This course provides a general introduction to the indigenous and contemporary arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America. In these vast locales of human culture, we will study how art provides concrete conceptual and visual structures around which social, political, cultural aesthetic and ritual institutions are constructed. The art object, imbued with several meanings, is essential to the human lifecycle, charged with political, economic and spiritual connotations and instrumental to rituals of birth, death and all the stages of transition in between. In such contexts, art operates within spaces of performance and individual art objects are imbued with multiple meanings. We will investigate the historical nature of different art traditions in these cultures and evaluate specific art forms like painting, sculpture, mural painting, textiles and decorative arts, body adornment, masquerade performances, royal/leadership arts, and sacred, secular and vernacular architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning     TR   1230-145   ONLINE    Wittman

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the middle of the 20th century. The focus is decidedly global in the first half of the course, and more European in the second half. Students will encounter a variety of buildings and cities, but also different ways of understanding and studying them. Student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local architecture and town planning.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6G     Survey: History of Photography     MW   330-445   ONLINE     McLemore

A critical survey of nineteenth and twentieth century photography as an art form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579-1648     TR   330-445   ONLINE     Adams

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

The first half of the seventeenth century in Holland, the period from the Union of Utrecht of 1579 and its declaration of independence from Spain, to the recognition of the Northern Netherlands as an independent nation in 1648, was the first part of a century that has come to be known as the Dutch "Golden Age" of Dutch art. This era witnessed the emergence of a Protestant mercantile culture in which the Catholic Church and the hereditary nobility were supplanted by democratic institutions and middle-class merchants as major patrons of the arts. These men and women supported such artists as Rembrandt van Rijn and Frans Hals as well as a host of lesser known masters who created images rooted in everyday life rather than the imaginary religious, historical, and mythological imagery of previous centuries. This course examines the cultural functions of this rich, apparently descriptive imagery as it helped to form the private identities and public ambitions of Europe's first middle-class capitalist society. We examine the aesthetics and content of this imagery through contemporary economic, historic, religious, and literary developments, and the emerging scientific revolution.

The emphasis in this class is upon the social and intellectual issues engaged by Dutch painting: how they participated in the struggle between the values of a new middle-class and capitalist culture in conflict with an older way of life. At the same time, it examines the varieties of art historical methods employed by contemporary scholars, as well as those of the past, to understand these images. The goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in knowledge about seventeenth century Dutch art and culture, with a focus upon critical analysis of images as well as the structure of arguments that have been made about them. These skills are intended to be ones that you may be able to apply both in other courses, as well as information you encounter and arguments you construct in your daily life.

GE: AREA F

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113B   Seventeenth Century Art in Italy I     MW   1100-1215   ONLINE     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
Not open to students who have completed ARTHI 113A.

Italian painting, sculpture, architecture, and urbanism from the late sixteenth to late seventeenth centuries examined in its cultural, political, and religious contexts, with emphasis on the relationship between the arts.Focus on the earlier seventeenth century, including the work of Caravaggio, Carracci, and the young Bernini.

GE: AREA F

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117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism      MW   1230-145   ONLINE     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movement in France from 1863 through the first decade of the twentieth century and the advent of Cubism. Includes the work of Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Pissarro, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Gauguin, and Seurat.

GE: AREA F

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119B   Contemporary Art     TR   500-615   ONLINE     Sorkin

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Study of recent artistic developments, from pop to contemporary movements in painting, sculpture, and photography. Movements studied include minimal art, post‐minimalism, process art, conceptual art, earthworks, pluralism, neoexpressionism, and issues of postmodern art and criticism.

GE: AREA F

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121A   American Art From Revolution to Civil War: 1700-1860     TR   1230-145   ONLINE     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Painting, sculpture, architecture and decorative arts in the original 13 colonies, through the formation of the United States, to the crisis of the Civil War. Particular attention paid to environmental and social issues.

GE: AREA F, AMERICAN HISTORY AND INSTITUTIONS

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131CM   Art of Colonial Mexico     TR   1100-1215   ONLINE     Caplan

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This lecture course examines the art of colonial Mexico in its major spaces of production: missions, metropolitan churches, colonial cities, indigenous communities, and arenas of global exchange. We will discuss a range of art media, including architecture, painting, public festivals, manuscripts, featherworks, and talavera. We will also consider how art production in these varied spaces came to form an idea of colonial Mexican art.

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136O   Sustainable Architecture: History and Aesthetics     MW   1100-1215   ONLINE     Welter
[cross-listed with ENV S 136O]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The course examines the history of environmentally sound building practices that have existed for centuries in traditional architecture and have been theorized as so-called “sustainable” architecture from the 20th century onward.

The critical analysis of the course emphasizes the history of and changing approaches to this kind of architecture, including recent examples. The course’s scope is global, yet as theories of sustainable architecture have historically emerged in the Western world, the latter is of focus in this historically oriented course.
        
Students commit to attend lectures, weekly quizzes, mid-term and final exams.

GE: AREA F

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186SV   Seminar in Modern Architecture     M   200-450   ONLINE     Welter
     Topic: Domestic Architecture in California

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This seminar will research shifting notions of domestic architecture in 20th century-California. Participants commit to weekly readings and writing a research paper.

GE: WRITING

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187H   Museums in Transition: From the Early Modern to the Modern Period     R   200-450   ONLINE     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
No restrictions to Pass 1.

Examines a range of issues — art historical, cultural, political, practical, and theoretical — that conditioned the development of museums and collections, primarily in Europe, from the Renaissance to the present day. Topics and format will vary.

GE: WRITING

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257A   Topics in Seventeenth-Century European Art     W   1200-250   ONLINE     Adams
     Topic: Representation and Protest in the Early Modern Period: The politics of belonging

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This course examines the impact of visual imagery upon protest movements, across European nations and their colonies, in the Early Modern Period.  As powerful political tools, images create communities of belonging and exclusion.  We investigate the role of class, gender, and race in their participants in protests that include political rebellion and religious conflict to food riots, witch hunts, and uprisings from students to slaves; and examine cultural responses, particularly erasures, in the creation of communities of belonging and exclusion.  Because much of this imagery was disseminated through prints, this course also examines the conditions of publication and their dissemination.  To help us further understand the history and culture behind these protests, the course may invite to our discussions, where possible, guest historians who have worked in this area.  As a final project, students will collectively mount an on-line exhibition.

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263   Topics in Contemporary Art     F   200-450   ONLINE     Sorkin
     Topic: Alchemy, Magic, and Spirituality

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This thematic course will consider votive practices; devotional objects and relics, community belief systems; theories of magic; the crisis of symbols and spirituality; primitivism, ritual, and embodied knowledge in historical conceptions of visual thinking. We will consider colonial and post-colonial cultural moments of the symbolic, the mythological, the spiritual.

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265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism     R   300-550   ONLINE     Wittman
     Topic: Romanticism, historicism, and architecture in Europe (c.1800 - c. 1850)

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Popular textbooks will tell you that neoclassical architecture gave way between 1800 and 1850 to a Romantic eclecticism that manifested itself in a variety of stylistic revivals. Such an account is problematic on a host of counts. This course proposes a more sophisticated inquiry that considers the development of architecture and theory from a cultural, political, and intellectual-history perspective. Our focus will be on France, England, the German speaking lands, and Italy. Questions to be (re)considered include: the status of the classical tradition c.1800; the meaning(s) of Romanticism; historicism and its implications; and the relationship of religion, nationalism, and modernity during this period.

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