2019-2020 Courses - Spring

Undergraduate

6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary - Garfinkle
6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America - Ogbechie
6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games - White

100   Methods for the History of Art and Architecture - Badamo
105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean - Badamo
107A   Painting in the 15th-Century Netherlands - Faust
115E    The Grand Tour: Experiencing Italy in the Eighteenth Century - Paul
136A   Nineteenth-Century Architecture - Chattopadhyay
136R   Architecture of the Americas - López
138B   Contemporary Photography - McLemore
138C   Social Documentary Photography - McLemore
141A   Museum Practices and Techniques - Sanderson
141H   Curating Contemporary Art - Sorkin
186A   Seminar in Research Methods: Digital Humanities - Baciu
186E   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art - Faust
186RS/282A   Seminar in Chinese Art: Art, Artifice, and Nature in Sixteenth-Century China - Sturman
186SS   Seminar in Architectural History & Urbanism: BarrioSpaces: The Latino/a/x Presence and the Built Environments of The American Southwest - López
187W   Coming Home: The House Museum as Cultural Encounter - White

Graduate

255D   Topics in Fifteenth- & Sixteenth-Century Art in Northern Europe: The Frame - Meadow
263   Topics in Contemporary Art: Sculpture and Identity - Sorkin
265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism: Spatial Histories of Empire - Chattopadhyay
282A/186RS   Topics on East Asian Art: Art, Artifice, and Nature in Sixteenth-Century China - Sturman
293D   Research Methods: Digital Humanities: Network Analysis - Gidding


6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary     ONLINE     Garfinkle

History of Western art from the eighteenth century to the present.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:     ONLINE

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6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America     ONLINE     Ogbechie

This course provides a general introduction to the indigenous and contemporary arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America. In these vast locales of human culture, we will study how art provides concrete conceptual and visual structures around which social, political, cultural aesthetic and ritual institutions are constructed. The art object, imbued with several meanings, is essential to the human lifecycle, charged with political, economic and spiritual connotations and instrumental to rituals of birth, death and all the stages of transition in between. In such contexts, art operates within spaces of performance and individual art objects are imbued with multiple meanings. We will investigate the historical nature of different art traditions in these cultures and evaluate specific art forms like painting, sculpture, mural painting, textiles and decorative arts, body adornment, masquerade performances, royal/leadership arts, and sacred, secular and vernacular architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games     ONLINE     White

This course introduces students to the history of games. It is organized chronologically as a global survey. We study games and the social, political,and economic conditions that support them, as well as the interface between the human player and the imagined world of the game. Taking as its premise that games are artifacts of culture, this course focuses on the visual and spatial practice of games in social context.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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100   Methods for the History of Art and Architecture     ONLINE     Badamo

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen; designed for majors.

Introduces History of Art & Architecture majors to the methods and skills of research and scholarship in the field.

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105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean     ONLINE     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Focusing on the Mediterranean, this course considers visual manifestations of exchange. Its goal is to examine the complexity of religious, political, and visual interactions in the Middle Ages, a period that brought together diverse religious communities, generating both social frictions and new cultural forms. Students will study the dynamic interplay among Christian, Jewish, and Islamic visual cultures as they developed and coalesced through commerce, gift exchange, the reinterpretation of pre-existing forms, and the reuse of objects and spaces.

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107A   Painting in the 15th-Century Netherlands     ONLINE     Faust

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Netherlandish painting from c. 1400 - c. 1500 examined in its social, religious,and cultural contexts. Van Eyck, Rogier, Bouts, and Memling, among others.

GE: AREA F

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115E   The Grand Tour: Experiencing Italy in the Eighteenth Century     ONLINE     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

In the eighteenth century, Italy was a mecca for European travelers who sought to enjoy its culture, diversions, landscape, and society. This course will examine the multifaceted experiences of these travelers and the ways in which they constitute the beginnings of the phenomenon of modern tourism.

GE: AREA E

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136A   Nineteenth-Century Architecture     ONLINE      Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The history of architecture and planning beginning with eighteenth-century architectural trends in Europe and concluding with late nineteenth-century efforts to reform the city. Exploration of the culture of nineteenth-century modernity through architecture and urban design centered around the themes of industrialization, colonialism, and the idea of landscape. The scope is global.

GE: AREA F

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136R   Architecture of the Americas     ONLINE     López

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

This lecture course examines the construction of various modern built environments of the Americas. This modernity is defined by its infrastructural expanse, political economic purpose, and its reckoning with the transition from colonialism to various American nationalisms as well as internal pseudo-colonial projects. Students will be encouraged to understand architecture, urbanism, planning, and the construction of the landscape as apparatuses engaged in the crafting of new national identities. In addition, they will be encouraged to understand these as vital components of inter-continental and increasingly global systems of resource extraction, industrialization, and trade.

GE: AREA F

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138B   Contemporary Photography     ONLINE     McLemore

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

American and European post-World War II photography considered as a living art form.

GE: AREA F

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138C   Social Documentary Photography     ONLINE     McLemore

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course takes seriously Susan Sontag's question "is it possible to be educated by photography?" In doing so, it will explore photography's role as a record, document, and evidence; and as a visual argument. Focusing on the mid-19th century to the present-day, it will address photographic representations of US western expansion, war, violence, poverty, politics, and national and global events. Throughout the course, we ask how and why we look to documentary photography as a way of understanding the past and present and what constitutes photographic knowledge?

GE: AREA F

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141A    Museum Practices and Techniques     ONLINE     Sanderson

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
Not open for credit to student who have completed ARTHI 164C.

Discussion of various aspects of museum work: management principles, the cataloging and care of art objects, exhibitions and acquisitions, administrative procedures, museum architecture. Specialist lectures and visits of museums and their facilities.

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141H    Curating Contemporary Art     ONLINE     Sorkin

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen; enrollment by instructor approval only.

Examines the history and practices of curating exhibitions and other forms of contemporary curatorial practice; expands the field by including diversepractices as educational programming, large-scale collaborations, and the commissioning of art works. Considers both institutional and independent programming, with the focus from the 1960s to the present. How do curatorial projects produce meaning? How do they conceive, shape and create communicative spaces? What kind of authorship do they imply?

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186A   Seminar in Research Methods     ONLINE      Baciu
     Topic: Digital Humanities

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advances in computation and record keeping make Data Science a rapidly evolving field of study. In turn, this development facilitates an entire new set of international, yet individualized services. In industry, science, and the humanities, everyone speaks of the digital transformation. This present introduction to the Digital Humanities will offer an overview of tools and methods such as text mining, network analysis, image tagging, and geographic information systems. We will develop group work around a selection of research projects including: Getty Provenance Index (Getty), ReCast (Carnegie Museum of Art), Bookworm (HathiTrust Research Center), Google Ngrams (Harvard PED, google books), Chicago Schools (DC Baciu), WhatEvery1Says (UCSB, Dept. of English). The course does not require previous experience.

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186E   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art     ONLINE     Faust

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in fifteenth and sixteenth century Northern European art. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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186RS/282A   Seminar in Chinese Art     ONLINE     Sturman
     Topic: Art, Artifice, and Nature in Sixteenth-Century China

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

The seminar will examine trends in art-making during the middle of the Ming dynasty, focusing primarily on the Jiangnan region (lower Yangtze River Delta). Taking full advantage of an exhibition at LACMA on the renowned but problematic painter Qiu Ying 仇英 (ca. 1494-ca.1552), we will trace developments and issues by focusing on select artists and paintings. Issues will circulate around the overarching theme of self-definition in an age of material prosperity and social change. The seminar will introduce some of the most renowned artists in the history of China, including the sage-like Shen Zhou 沈周 (1427-1509), his famous Suzhou pupils Wen Zhengming 文徵明 (1470-1559) and Tang Yin 唐寅 (1470-1524), and the brilliant but violent Xu Wei 徐渭 (1520-1593), before concluding with the early phase of the art and theories of Dong Qichang 董其昌 (1555-1636). With trips to the Museum planned, students interested in learning about connoisseurship and the problems of authentication in Chinese art will be especially well-served by the Qiu Ying exhibition. Seminar participants will be encouraged to tailor their final projects to individual interests. This is a rare opportunity to learn about one of the golden eras of Chinese art and culture in a small class setting and with the added benefit of an exhibition showcasing exceptional works of art, many of which are borrowed from important Chinese museums.

Please contact Professor Sturman for more information.

GE: WRITING

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186SS   Seminar in Architectural History & Urbanism     ONLINE     López
     Topic: BarrioSpaces: The Latino/a/x Presence and the Built Environments of The American Southwest

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; enrollment by instructor approval only.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.

This seminar focuses on the Latino/a/x, Hispanic, and Chicano/a/x presence in the Southwest United States and its effects on the construction of their built environments. It will explore informal domestic and commercial architectures, public housing and civic spaces, urban planning and preservation, and various forms of cultural and artistic production through a socio-economic lens. This focus will explore how the social challenges of immigration, segregation, raza-fication, integration, and transculturation have caused varied shifts in cultural identity and how both racial and economic forces have delineated territories of barrio-ization, gentrification, displacement, and gradual suburbanization, all of which has had profound effects on the production of the built and expressive environments of this broadly defined demographic.

GE: WRITING

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187W   Coming Home: The House Museum as Cultural Encounter     ONLINE     White

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; designed for majors.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This seminar studies the political and cultural history of the house museum in the United States, from its antebellum beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present. Explores a variety of issues related to the house museum, including curatorial and design choices, visitor experiences, and the House Museum Movement.

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255D   Topics in Fifteenth- & Sixteenth-Century Art in Northern Europe     ONLINE     Meadow
     Topic: The Frame

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

In this class we will be exploring the frame and framing as concepts and devices, with particular attention, as a test case, to their role in art of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. We can think of the frame in a variety of ways: as that which delimits and contains the image, as that which mediates between the represented and experienced worlds, as that which structures the relationship between viewer and representation. Framing gives order and continuity to potentially chaotic fictive worlds. Framing provides the matrix by which viewers comprehend narratives, by which time and space are ordered. Framing creates the possibility for perceiving the interrelations between self and other. Questions will be raised about completion and incompletion, about layers of reality, about address between image and viewer, about illusion and perception, about order and chaos.

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263   Topics in Contemporary Art     ONLINE     Sorkin
     Topic: Sculpture and Identity

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This graduate-level course explores sculpture as it morphed into large-scale installation art during the 1980s and 1990s in the United States and beyond, both in alternative and museum spaces, and in global exhibition platforms. We will look at the intertwined politics of identity as artwork became a vehicle for expressions of class, race, sexuality, queer history, pleasure, disability, and beyond.

Conveying abstraction, embodiment and corporeality, sculpture and installation-based artworks offered dynamic structures for examinations of the social in the shadow of AIDS and globalization. We will examine artworks and thematic exhibitions through readings, presentations, and field trips to Los Angeles (scheduled on mutually workable times, not required).

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265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism     ONLINE     Chattopadhyay
     Topic: Spatial Histories of Empire

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Taking the experiments with writing “connected histories” of empire as a jumping off point, this graduate seminar will explore how we write spatial histories. Focusing on the history of the British empire, the seminar will attend to the scale of empire, conceptions of time, modes of representation (particularly, architecture and urban plans, maps and cartography), and the emergence of new spatial types, landscapes, and infrastructures. We will discuss methods of archival research and fieldwork, and what constitutes spatialization in historical narration.

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282A/186RS   Topics on East Asian Art     ONLINE     Sturman
     Topic: Art, Artifice, and Nature in Sixteenth-Century China

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

The seminar will examine trends in art-making during the middle of the Ming dynasty, focusing primarily on the Jiangnan region (lower Yangtze River Delta). Taking full advantage of an exhibition at LACMA on the renowned but problematic painter Qiu Ying 仇英 (ca. 1494-ca.1552), we will trace developments and issues by focusing on select artists and paintings. Issues will circulate around the overarching theme of self-definition and agency in an age of material prosperity and social change. The seminar will begin with the late work of Shen Zhou 沈周 (1427-1509) and its influence on the next generation of Suzhou artists before continuing to other regions and individual masters, including Xu Wei 徐渭 (1520-1593) and select professional masters. We will conclude with the early phase of the art and theories of Dong Qichang 董其昌 (1555-1636). Wednesday meetings will divide into lectures, discussions, and short student presentations. Graduate students will attend the first part of the Wednesday meetings as well as an additional weekly session on Fridays (TBA) for the reading and discussion of primary texts and visits to LACMA for close examination of objects and discussions regarding connoisseurship and authenticity (undergraduates also encouraged to attend). All students will work on a seminar project tailored toward individual interests.

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293D   Topics in Research Methods     ONLINE     Gidding
     Topic: Digital Humanities: Network Analysis

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This course will review methods employed in the digital humanities. The initial focus will be on what “the digital humanities” means as a term, pedagogy, and practice. Contemporaneously students will learn the technical skills necessary to create and evaluate work in the Digital Humanities using the statistical software R. We will use this as a platform to begin to explore network analysis as a method within Art History and broader humanistic inquiry. Throughout the course we will employ a critical approach to the application of digital tools and techniques in order to develop project ideas where they would best be employed.

Note: No prior knowledge of R or coding required.

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